Fossil Grove House
Victoria Park, Glasgow
culture

Fossil Grove House
Victoria Park, Glasgow


Status
Feasibility Study Completed December 2011


Client
Fossil Grove Trust /
Glasgow City Council


Contract
Value £tbc


Funders
Fossil Grove Trust /
Glasgow City Council


In June 2011 Collective Architecture, won a mini competition to undertake a feasibility study for the Fossil Grove House, with a view to providing 3 concept options. These were to include the refurbishment of the existing building, adaptation and alteration of the existing building, and an option for a new building for Fossil Grove.

The study has been funded by the Fossil Grove Trust and Glasgow City Council who believe there is great potential to develop the site and improve access for visitors, as well as providing improved educational and interpretive facilities for use by the public.

The feasibility study aims to explore the strengths and weaknesses of the existing building, and develop three concept options, in order to advise on the best solution to for the future development of Fossil Grove.

A basic rudimentary refurbishment of the ‘House’ to ensure prolonged protection from the elements and to bring it up to current standards of access, facilities and environmental conditions for the continued preservation of the fossils.

Similar to option 1 but going a bit further to include an extension designed to complement the grove and the existing refurbished ‘House’. The extension should incorporate a multi-purpose room, which could be used as a classroom or meeting room, with possible anti-rooms and a new toilet facility for visitors.

A new building to provide a modern, up to date, sympathetically designed facility to complement the fossils and the grove and to provide a long lasting experience to visitors.

In carrying out the feasibility study with the Design Team, Collective Architecture have been careful to respect the unique character of Fossil Grove, and to consider the history of the current building that houses the fossils. The original building, constructed in 1890, has been significantly altered over the past 121 years. The building has undergone a number of alterations, in order to try and protect the fossils from the elements. This has led to a loss of the original ecclesiastical character of the building, and has also resulted in the loss of any natural lighting within the building. Our concept options all seek to reintroduce natural daylight to the fossils, whilst protecting them from temperature fluctuations.